The staff of Rolling Hills Hospital believe in and strive to maintain a total therapeutic environment through an individualized treatment approach for each patient and family. Each program is designed to provide services appropriate to the scope and level of care required by the patient population served.

Comprehensive treatment-oriented activities are provided by a multi-disciplinary staff. Clinical staff provide group therapy, family therapy and activity therapy. All clinical services are delivered by qualified professional staff including, but not limited to, psychiatrists, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, mental health workers, clinical social workers, a dietitian, pharmacist, substance abuse counselors, and certified activity therapists. Clinical services that are not available within the facility may be provided through referral, consultation or contractual agreements with professionals and other health care facilities.

The goal of treatment is to promote the highest level of functioning for each patient with emphasis on individual, group and family therapy provided at the least restrictive level of care. The patient’s symptoms, strengths, family supports and discharge needs provide the basis for care from admission to discharge.

615.628.5700 main 1.800.832.0388 respond
You can contact a Respond intake Clinician 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for an Intake or Referral.




The Adult Psychiatric Program is designed for the treatment of adult patients, ages 18 and over, with primary psychiatric diagnoses. Some patients may have a secondary substance abuse diagnosis who meet the criteria for medically supervised in-patient treatment. The program is based in an acute-care setting in a 27-bed unit, and is in operation 24 hours per day, seven days per week.

area of care service providers
Psychiatric Evaluation Psychiatrists
Psychosocial Assessment Social Work Services Staff
Nursing Assessment Registered Nurses
History and Physical Exam Physicians
Medical/Surgical Consults Physicians
Dietary Consults Registered Dietitian

 




The Adolescent Treatment Program* is designed for the treatment of adolescents, ages 13 to 18, with primary psychiatric diagnoses who meet the criteria for medically-supervised, inpatient acute treatment. Excluded are those patients who are so medically unstable that their safety requires treatment in a medical-surgical hospital; those who meet criteria for less restrictive treatment; or those with chronic organic brain dysfunction without treatable psychiatric symptoms. The Adolescent Treatment Services program operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week, within an 18-bed unit in an acute care setting. Areas of care provided by identified service providers are :

area of care service providers
Speech, Language and Hearing Testing Speech Language Therapist
Development History Social Work Services Staff
Psychiatric Evaluation Psychiatrists
Psychosocial Assessment Social Work Services Staff
Nursing Assessment Registered Nurses
History and Physical Exam Physicians
Medical/Surgical Consults Physicians
Dietary Consults Registered Dietitian

*The initial assessment of individuals with eating disorders involves a thorough review of the patient’s history, current symptoms, physical status, weight control measures, and other psychiatric issues or disorders such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, or personality issues. Consultation with a physician and a registered dietitian is often recommended. The initial assessment is the first step in establishing a diagnosis and treatment plan. Patients with eating disorders typically require a treatment team consisting of a primary care physician, dietitian, and a mental health professional knowledgeable about eating disorders. Treatment must often involve clinicians from different health disciplines including psychologists, psychotherapists, physicians, dietitians, and nurses.
 




The Adult Co-occurring Program is designed for the treatment of patients, ages 18 and older, with a substance abuse disorder with or without a co-occurring mental health condition that meet criteria for medically supervised inpatient detox treatment. Patients who are so medically fragile that their safety demands treatment in a medical/surgical setting, or who are so mentally impaired that they cannot reasonably benefit from treatment, or who meet the criteria for treatment in a lesser restrictive setting may be excluded. The program operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week, in an acute care setting, in a 15-bed unit. Areas of care provided by identified service providers are the same as for the Adult Psychiatric Program with the following additions:

area of care service providers
Medically manages detoxification Physicians, Registered Nurses
Chemical Dependency Assessment Counselors, Registered Nurses, Social Workers
Individual/Family/Group Therapy Social Work Services, Nurses, and MHTs

 




The Adult Partial Hospitalization Program is a structured program that provides group counseling and other therapeutic services in a compassionate and healing environment. This program is designed to meet the mental health needs of those in crisis. The goal of treatment is to promote the highest level of functioning of each person with emphasis on medication management, individual, and group therapy. Each person’s symptoms, strengths, family supports and discharge needs provide the basis for care from admission to discharge. Rolling Hills Partial Hospitalization Program meets Monday through Friday from 8a.m. till 3p.m. Each treatment day consists of psycho-education and therapeutic process groups. Each patient will be meeting with a psychiatrist once a week for medication management.


Admissions Criteria:
1. The individual is 18 years old or older.
2. The individual has had a diagnostic assessment which indicates the individual’s need for partial hospitalization.
3. The individual is committed to the Partial Hospitalization Program. Motivation for treatment may be external (court ordered, family ultimatum) or internal (individual has made the decision themselves to change).
4. Stressors in the individuals life warrant multiple therapy sessions per week but do not exceed the individual’s ability to manage stressors with added support of Partial Hospitalization Program and the individual’s personal resources.
5. Individuals may be an actual and/or potential danger to themselves but are able to contract for safety and have other resources that help them maintain their safety contract outside of the program hours.
6. The individual’s family members, significant others, and/or living situations do not pose a threat to the individual’s safety or engagement in treatment.
7. The individual does not meet criteria for acute hospitalization or is experiencing a failure of outpatient treatment.
8. Individual must have reliable transportation.
 




The goal of the Intensive Outpatient Program is to promote the highest level of functioning of each person through interactive education groups, co-occurring counseling groups, individual sessions, outside/consultant speaker groups, a family program, and aftercare groups. Restore Hope Intensive Outpatient Program meets three times a week (Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday) for three hours per session, from 6-9pm. The average intensive outpatient program lasts four to five weeks.

area of care service providers
Medically manages detoxification Physicians, Registered Nurses
Chemical Dependency Assessment Counselors, Registered Nurses, Social Workers
Individual/Family/Group Therapy Social Work Services, Nurses, and MHTs

 




The Older Adult Treatment Program are designed for the treatment of adult patients, ages 65 and over, with primary psychiatric diagnoses. The Geriatric Treatment Services program operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week, within a 23-bed unit in an acute care setting. The program is based in an acute-care setting in a 24-bed unit, and is in operation 24 hours per day, seven days per week.

area of care service providers
Psychiatric Evaluation Psychiatrists
Psychosocial Assessment Social Work Services Staff
Nursing Assessment Registered Nurses
History and Physical Exam Physicians
Medical/Surgical Consults Physicians
Dietary Consults Registered Dietitian

 



Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) is recognized by the National Institute of Mental Health as a successful treatment option for severe depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Today, as many as 100,000 people in the United States receive ECT each year to treat these illnesses. Clinical and technical improvements in ECT have resulted in more effective treatments with fewer side effects. ECT can work faster than psychiatric medications or psychotherapy and it can help when other treatments have failed, providing dramatic, life-saving results.

ElectroConvulsive Therapy
Electroconvulsive Therapy began in the early 1930’s, when researchers injected chemicals in people to induce seizures. The chemicals were soon replaced with electrical currents. Today, ECT is a highly refined procedure, with precisely calculated electrical currents administered in a controlled medical setting.

Who might benefit from ECT?
ECT is most commonly indicated for people with severe depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia that haven’t improved with medications or other treatment modalities. Patients with these illnesses may experience sadness, despair, difficulty concentrating, loss of appetite and inability to sleep. They may also have suicidal tendencies. Today, as many as 100,000 people in the U.S. receive ECT each year to treat these mental illnesses.

What can be expected?
A small intravenous (IV) catheter is inserted in the patient’s arm or hand by a registered nurse or anesthesiologist. An anesthetic is given through the IV, along with a strong muscle relaxant. These general anesthetic agents allow the patient to drift gently off to sleep. A mouth guard is used to protect one’s teeth and tongue. While asleep, a small, precisely calculated dose of electricity is delivered between two electrodes to induce a closely monitored seizure. The patient wakes up after approximately ten to fifteen minutes without discomfort or memory of the treatment. The patient is then carefully observed in the recovery room until discharge. Under normal circumstances, the entire procedure, from admission to discharge lasts about 2 - 2 1/2 hours.

What are the main side effects of ECT?
It is common for patients to experience some confusion immediately after an ECT treatment. A patient may wake up and not remember where he or she is or why he or she is receiving ECT. This generally lasts from a few minutes to several hours. Often patients describe their thinking as “feeling hazy” or “clouded”. This typically goes away when the course of treatment is completed. Many patients experience temporary loss of recent or remote memories with ECT, especially with bilateral ECT. Doctors may use special techniques (such as right unilateral ECT) to minimize effects on memory. In most patients, memory disturbances usually resolve within a few days or weeks, but occasionally may continue in a mild form for a period of months or even longer. Other common side effects that may occur on the days a patient has an ECT treatment are nausea, headache, muscle aches, or jaw discomfort. These side effects can be effectively treated with medications to lessen them or alleviate them completely.

How many treatments are given and how often?
A patient usually receives an ECT treatment two to three times a week for a total of six to twelve treatments. ECT is an exceptionally effective medical treatment, helping 90% of patients who receive it. Most patients remain well for many months after a treatment course; however, monthly or bimonthly maintenance treatments are also an option to maintain disease remission.

How does ECT work?
It is still not completely understood how ECT helps treat mental illnesses. It is known, however, that many neurochemical changes occur during and after seizure activity. It is theorized that when ECT is administered on a regular basis, these neurochemical changes build upon one another and reduce the symptoms of the mental illness.

Today’s ECT
Despite its unpopular past, electroconvulsive therapy is now a safe and effective treatment for severe depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. ECT can work faster than psychiatric medications or psychotherapy can, and it can help when other treatments have failed. It is also safe for elderly patients and pregnant patients. Our experienced team of psychiatrists, anesthesiologists, and registered nurses has received extensive specialized training in electroconvulsive therapy in order to provide our patients with the very best care in a safe, compassionate environment.

At Rolling Hills Hospital, ECT is performed on both an inpatient and outpatient basis. Referrals for ECT may be made via the ECT Fast Track process. For more information please contact Jan Daniels R.N., ECT Charge Nurse at 615.628.5743.